Leadership Tennessee Announces Class V

By Kim Chaudoin | 615.966.6494 

Lipscomb University’s College of Leadership & Public Service today announced the 2017-18 class for Leadership Tennessee, a leadership education program designed to cultivate a network of business, nonprofit, education and government leaders who are committed to addressing the state’s challenges and opportunities.

Leadership Tennessee officials are also celebrating a program milestone — its fifth year of impacting the state. The program was launched in February 2013.

“In my view, Leadership Tennessee has set the national standard in public service leadership development,” said Steve Joiner, dean of the College of Leadership & Public Service. “Since the program’s inception, 135 highly influential leaders have completed the program and they are shaping the future of Tennessee, in no small part because of their experiences and the networking opportunities across regions and sectors. Leadership Tennessee models the mission of the College of Leadership & Public Service through ‘theory-to-practice’ education and development.”

The 2017-18 class includes 42 business, government, education and nonprofit leaders from across Tennessee.

“When Lipscomb University launched Leadership Tennessee in 2013, the need for a space for collaborative conversation was certainly understood. What wasn't completely understood was how important this network of connected and better-informed leaders would be to the success of Tennessee. Over the past four years we have celebrated the diversity of our state and provided a common understanding of how each geographic region and professional sector can work together to support the success of the entire state. With the announcement of Class V, we look forward to continued conversations around critical issues of importance and meeting challenges with an eye towards what makes each region special, but also how we can come together for the common good,” said Cathy Cate, executive director of Leadership Tennessee.

Leadership Tennessee is a 10-month program that provides collaborative learning and dialogue spanning the state and opportunities to affect change.  In 2015, Leadership Tennessee received a $750,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to expand the program’s offerings, scope and impact on Tennessee.

Members of the 2017-18 Leadership Tennessee class

Brownsville: William Rawls, mayor, City of Brownsville

Chattanooga: Stephen Culp, CEO/General Partner, Delegator.com, PriceWaiter.com, Chattanooga Renaissance Fund; Wade Hinton, city attorney/chief legal officer, City of Chattanooga; Andrew Kean, partner/co-founder, Alderman Holdings; Tim Kelly, president, Kelly Auto Group; Elaine Swafford, executive director, Chattanooga Girls Leadership Academy; Roy Vaughn, senior vice president/chief communications officerBlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee; Scott Neal Wilson, head of communications, Volkswagen Group of America, Chattanooga Operations

Franklin: Greg Allen, president, Midsouth; Cigna

Kingsport: Miles Burdine, president and CEO, Kingsport Chamber of Commerce; Jessica Stollings, president, ReGenerations; Laura Woods, senior attorney, Eastman

Knoxville: Dr. Keith D. Gray, associate professor and chief of surgical oncology, University of Tennessee Medical Center – Knoxville; Bill Lyons, deputy to the mayor, chief policy officer; City of Knoxville; Phyllis Young Nichols, president and CEO, Knoxville Area Urban League; David Rausch, chief of police, Knoxville Police Department; Melanie Wilson, Dean & Lindsay Young Distinguished Professor of Law; University of Tennessee College of Law

Lebanon: Dr. Paul C. Stumb, president, Cumberland University

Memphis: Raumesh Akbari, state representative, Tennessee House of Representatives; J.W. Gibson, II, CEO/Chairman, Gibson Companies Inc.; Emily Greer, chief administrative officer, ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; Jim Strickland, mayor, City of Memphis; Ted Townsend, deputy commissioner & COO, Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development; Kevin Woods, executive director; Workforce Investment Network, City of Memphis

Nashville: Danielle Barnes, commissioner, Tennessee Department of Human Services; Jeff Bivins, chief justice, Tennessee Supreme Court; Lyndsay Botts, deputy commissioner/chief of staff, Tennessee Department of Transportation; Maya Bugg, CEO, Tennessee Charter Center; Dr. Alex Jahangir, medical director; Vanderbilt Center for Trauma, Burn, and Emergency Surgery; Vanderbilt University Medical Center; Mike Krause, executive director, Tennessee Higher Education Commission; Kenyatta Lovett, executive director, Complete Tennessee; Rob McCabe, chairman, Pinnacle Financial Partners; Janet Miller, CEO/market leader, Colliers International; Rob Mortensen, principal/founder, Kettle Hill Solutions; Gini Pupo-Walker, senior director of education policy and strategic growth, Conexión Américas; Lisa Quigley, chief of staff; Representative Jim Cooper, US House of Representatives; Tara Scarlett, president/CEO, Scarlett Family Foundation; Stephen Susano, COO and principal, Stones River Group; Stephanie Teatro, co-executive director, Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition; Dr. Phil Wenk, president and CEO, Delta Dental of Tennessee

New Johnsonville: Greg Martz, plant manager, Chemours

Tazewell: Robert Barger, president and CEO, First Century Bank

Past classes have focused on key issues impacting the state including education, economic development and health and wellness. During the course of the program, each class participates in learning and conversation designed to give them a greater understanding of the complex issues affecting the success of the state. The 2017-18 Leadership Tennessee class will commence with a retreat in August.

Program participants said they have gained new perspective through Leadership Tennessee

“Our state is wide geographically and culturally diverse. If you really want to understand its challenges and opportunities, you have to spend time with Tennesseans in each major area, including rural and urban,” said Theresa Carl, president, Governor's Books From Birth Foundation based in Nashville and Class II member. “Leadership Tennessee affords the unique opportunity to make important connections statewide and to foster meaningful conversations that can lead to long-lasting impacts.

“There’s really no other program quite like Leadership Tennessee – from the staff to the members and those we have the opportunity to know during the year. As classes are added, the network of passionate Tennesseans who can influence greatness for our state will deepen and broaden. I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to participate.”

Class III member David Golden, senior vice president, chief legal and sustainability officer and corporate secretary for Eastman and Class V selection committee chair, said Leadership Tennessee helped increase his awareness of issues in other parts of the state.

“There is a great deal of distance between Mountain City and Memphis,” said Golden, of Kingsport. “Leadership Tennessee has made the state ‘smaller’ and helped me understand at a granular level the challenges and opportunities across the state. Leadership Tennessee has been a catalyst to drive understanding and propagate creative approaches to problem solving. It brings diverse sectors together for the common good.

“Leadership Tennessee drives inclusion, partnership, collaboration, and innovative thinking,” he continued. “It takes people who are working hard in their various spheres and brings them together in a powerful way,” he continued. “I treasure the time I spent with my Leadership Tennessee classmates.  There is tremendous power in shared purpose. There are remarkable people doing good across the state and Leadership Tennessee affords an opportunity to witness the work and join it in a very productive way.”

The program strengthens the state by bringing its leaders together, participants say.

“One of the biggest lessons this program teaches is that no matter what part of the state we live in, we all face the same challenges — workforce development, health care and education among others. Leadership Tennessee provides leaders throughout the state opportunities to meet each other, realize that we have the same issues and find solutions together,” said Bruce Hartmann, president of the Chattanooga Times-Free Press and Class IV member. “We live in a great state, and through Leadership Tennessee bringing this state’s leaders together to identify problems and opportunities we can accomplish a great deal and it will make Tennessee stronger.”

“Leadership Tennessee connected me with numerous leaders from all levels of government, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions and businesses that helped me in my pursuit to serve veterans with an expanded focus,” said Many-Bears Grinder, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Veterans Services and Class I member. “Doors have been opened to break down barriers for veterans seeking higher education, career and business opportunities.” 

“Visiting rural and metropolitan communities all across the state gave me insights to challenges and innovations, which I then applied in working with county mayors, veterans and in developing new partners to support our most deserving population,” continued Grinders, who lives in Nashville. “Sharing ideas, contacts and resources are helping to grow a better Tennessee – one session and one class at a time.  Continuing to engage through the alumni program expands my network and allows me to contribute even further.”

 For more information about Leadership Tennessee visit www.leadershiptennessee.org or contact Cate at 615.966.5180 cathy.cate@leadershiptennessee.org.

Titans Join Pinnacle Financial Partners to Host Leadership Tennessee Dinner

 Mayor Megan Barry, Ron Samuels, Representative Diane Black

Mayor Megan Barry, Ron Samuels, Representative Diane Black

January 23, 2017 - By Lynne McCracken

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The Tennessee Titans partnered with Pinnacle Financial Partners to host members of “Leadership Tennessee” Monday at Nissan Stadium.

Leadership Tennessee is a 10-month program that brings together influential thought leaders from diverse backgrounds to not only learn more about the rich cultural heritage of our state, but also tackle tough issues that affect our state's success. Through dialogue and an expanding network, Leadership Tennessee members are taking what they see and learn on a statewide level and put it into action in their own communities. 

Established in 2013, the class includes 40 business, government, education and nonprofit leaders from across Tennessee.

Ron Samuels, vice-chairman of Pinnacle Financial Partners, joined the 2015-16 class and also served on the “Just Build It” committee that helped build Nissan Stadium and bring in season ticket holders.

“This is an action,” Samuels said.  “Leaders really value action and this is a leadership program.  Some of the class members have taken off on projects of bringing a new business to their community or helping the state as they go out and recruit companies.

“I was very fortunate to work with the Nashville Sports Council 20 years ago now and we had the desire to have a professional sports team here.  Never in all my wildest dreams would I have thought that we would have been involved in a professional sports franchise, but that was fantastic! We get a chance to help people across the state, feel a part of the Titans organization. We also have the chance to do things like we are doing tonight to bring people together and it’s a lot of fun!  We are committed to the community and committed to the Titans at Pinnacle and I love it!”

Leadership Tennessee brings together all the disparate parts of our state to build partnerships and unify leaders behind a common cause for the betterment of citizens and Pinnacle takes that mission very seriously. 

Said Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, a guest speaker at the event: “Nashville is a community that says, ‘What can I do for you?’”  

Barry discussed the priorities of improving the educational outcomes at public schools, public safety, engaging regional and state partners to develop a unified vision, a plan for transportation, creating more affordable housing options for residents of all backgrounds, including the homeless and veterans, and continuing to grow our economy, while ensuring all parts of Davidson County share in the prosperity.  “Nashville is a special place,” Barry said.

 “I am here as part of a program called Leadership Tennessee and it’s a group of individual leaders from across the state of Tennessee where we get together for a 10 month period and visit different areas across the state,” said Valoria Armstrong, president of Tennessee American Water.  “From a networking standpoint, it has been phenomenal.  For me personally, it’s allowed me to learn more about my state of Tennessee, what’s happening and really a lot of the great treasures we have that we really don’t know about.”

 “The Titans have been so gracious to welcome us to the stadium for dinner tonight as we have some conversations about how wonderful our state is and ways we can improve our state and individual communities,” said Judge Brandon Gibson. Tennessee Court of Appeals.  “I’ve been very involved in my community in west Tennessee from a variety of perspectives from before I was on the court and after I was on the court and it’s a good opportunity to maybe borrow some great ideas for our own communities.”

“Being Tennessee’s NFL team, it’s an honor to partner with Pinnacle in bringing these visionaries from all over our great state to Nissan Stadium,” said Titans Director of Marketing Brad McClanahan. “It’s our sincere hope these leaders will take what they learn here and ingrain those ideas into their own communities throughout the entire state.”


Members of the 2016-17 Leadership Tennessee class include:

Alamo: Judge Brandon Gibson, Tennessee Court of Appeals

Chattanooga: Steven Angle, chancellor, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; Valoria Armstrong, president, Tennessee American Water; Alexis Bogo, executive director, Hamico Inc.; Bruce Hartmann, president, Chattanooga Times Free Press; JD Hickey, president and CEO, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee; Jill Levine, chief academic officer, Hamilton County Department of Education; Maura Sullivan, chief operating officer, City of Chattanooga

Franklin: Mendy Mazzo, vice president, Skanska; Jerry Stump, president and COO, Volkert, Inc.

Gallatin: Congressman Diane Black, United States Congress

Jackson: Kyle Spurgeon, president and CEO, Jackson Chamber

Johnson City: Bill Greer, president, Milligan College

Kingsport: CeeGee McCord, director, Global Public Affairs and Corporate Responsibility, Eastman; Commissioner Kevin Triplett, Tennessee Department of Tourist Development

Knoxville: Christi Branscom, deputy to the mayor/COO, City of Knoxville; Krissy DeAlejandro, executive director, tnAchieves; Steve Diggs, president and CEO, Emerald Youth Foundation; Justin Maierhofer, vice president, government relations, Tennessee Valley Authority; Steve Mangum, Dean & Stokely Leadership Foundation Chair, Haslam College of Business, University of Tennessee Knoxville; Frank Rothermel, president, Denark Construction; Anthony Wise, president, Pellissippi State Community College

Lookout Mountain: Miller Wellborn, chairman, SmartBank and SmartFinancial, Inc.

Memphis: Greg Duckett, senior vice president and chief legal officer, Baptist Memorial Health Care Corporation; Cato Johnson, senior vice president, Public Policy & Regulatory Affairs, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare; Estella Mayhue-Greer, president and CEO, Mid-South Food Bank; Senator Mark Norris, Tennessee General Assembly; Terence Patterson, president, Downtown Memphis Commission; Phil Trenary, president and CEO, Greater Memphis Chamber; Representative Mark White, Tennessee General Assembly

Nashville: Michael Anastasi, vice president of news, USA Today Network – Tennessee; Executive Editor, TheTennessean; Laura Berlind, executive director, The Sycamore Institute; Harold Carpenter, executive vice president and CFO, Pinnacle Financial Partners Inc.; Trish Holliday, assistant commissioner and chief learning officer, State of Tennessee Department of Human Resources; David Mansouri, president, State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE); Pam Brooks Martin, president, Cushion Employer Services; Patricia Shea, CEO, YWCA Nashville & Middle Tennessee; Dwight Tarwater, counsel to the governor, Governor Bill Haslam, State of Tennessee; LoLita Toney, director of development, National Museum of African American Music; Senator Jeff Yarbro, Tennessee General Assembly

Leadership Tennessee is an initiative of Lipscomb University’s College of Leadership & Public Service and their mission fosters collaborative, non-partisan dialogue on issues of state importance connecting a network of diverse leaders and engaged citizens.

About Pinnacle Financial Partners
Pinnacle Financial Partners provides a full range of banking, investment, trust, mortgage and insurance products and services designed for businesses and their owners and individuals interested in a comprehensive relationship with their financial institution. The American Banker recognized Pinnacle as the sixth best bank to work for in the country in 2016.

Pinnacle is the largest locally owned bank in Nashville and fourth overall in terms of total deposits. The firm operates 29 offices in Middle Tennessee including 10 in Davidson County, eight in Rutherford County and four each in Williamson and Wilson Counties. Pinnacle is also the official banking partner of the Tennessee Titans.

The firm began operations in a single downtown Nashville location in October 2000 and has since grown to approximately $11.2 billion in assets as of Dec. 31, 2016. As the second-largest bank holding company headquartered in Tennessee, Pinnacle operates in the state’s four largest markets, Nashville, Memphis, Knoxville and Chattanooga, as well as several surrounding counties.

Additional information concerning Pinnacle, which is included in the NASDAQ Financial-100 Index, can be accessed at www.pnfp.com

For more information about Leadership Tennessee visit www.leadershiptennessee.org

Leadership Tennessee Announces Class IV

Lipscomb University’s College of Leadership & Public Service today announced the 2016-17 class for Leadership Tennessee, a leadership education program designed to cultivate a network of business, nonprofit, education and government leaders who are committed to addressing the state’s challenges and opportunities.

The class includes 40 business, government, education and nonprofit leaders from across Tennessee.

“Since the kickoff in 2013, Leadership Tennessee has brought together influential thought leaders from diverse backgrounds to not only learn more about the rich cultural heritage of our state, but also tackle tough issues that affect our state's success. Through dialogue and an expanding network, Leadership Tennessee members are taking what they see and learn on a statewide level and putting it into action in their own communities,” said Cathy Cate, executive director of Leadership Tennessee.

Cate said the program is quickly making an impact on Tennessee.

“With the announcement of its fourth class, Leadership Tennessee has proven the level of experience and leadership and the diversity of thought, perspective and regional and professional sector representation can be sustained. The quality and number of applicants continues to grow each year and we are excited to invite this next group of Leadership Tennessee members to a network of leaders around the state who are committed to the idea that we must all work together to create a stronger Tennessee.”

Leadership Tennessee is a 10-month program that provides collaborative learning and dialogue spanning the state’s three grand divisions, issue-specific education for demonstrated leaders, a diverse representation of participants and opportunities to affect change.  Last year, Leadership Tennessee received a $750,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to expand the program’s offerings, scope and impact on Tennessee.

Members of the 2016-17 Leadership Tennessee class

Alamo: Judge Brandon Gibson, Tennessee Court of Appeals

Chattanooga: Steven Angle, chancellor, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; Valoria Armstrong, president, Tennessee American Water; Alexis Bogo, executive director, Hamico Inc.; Bruce Hartmann, president, Chattanooga Times Free Press; JD Hickey, president and CEO, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee; Jill Levine, chief academic officer, Hamilton County Department of Education; Maura Sullivan, chief operating officer, City of Chattanooga

Franklin: Mendy Mazzo, vice president, Skanska; Jerry Stump, president and COO, Volkert, Inc.

Gallatin: Congressman Diane Black, United States Congress

Jackson: Kyle Spurgeon, president and CEO, Jackson Chamber

Johnson City: Bill Greer, president, Milligan College

KingsportCeeGee McCord, director, Global Public Affairs and Corporate Responsibility, Eastman; Commissioner Kevin Triplett, Tennessee Department of Tourist Development

Knoxville: Christi Branscom, deputy to the mayor/COO, City of Knoxville; Krissy DeAlejandro, executive director, tnAchieves; Steve Diggs, president and CEO, Emerald Youth Foundation; Justin Maierhofer, vice president, government relations, Tennessee Valley Authority; Steve Mangum, Dean & Stokely Leadership Foundation Chair, Haslam College of Business, University of Tennessee Knoxville; Frank Rothermel, president, Denark Construction; Anthony Wise, president, Pellissippi State Community College

Lookout Mountain: Miller Wellborn, chairman, SmartBank and SmartFinancial, Inc.

Memphis: Greg Duckett, senior vice president and chief legal officer, Baptist Memorial Health Care Corporation; Cato Johnson, senior vice president, Public Policy & Regulatory Affairs, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare; Estella Mayhue-Greer, president and CEO, Mid-South Food Bank; Senator Mark Norris, Tennessee General Assembly; Terence Patterson, president, Downtown Memphis Commission; Phil Trenary, president and CEO, Greater Memphis Chamber; Representative Mark White, Tennessee General Assembly

Nashville: Michael Anastasi, vice president of news, USA Today Network – Tennessee; Executive Editor, TheTennessean; Laura Berlind, executive director, The Sycamore Institute; Harold Carpenter, executive vice president and CFO, Pinnacle Financial Partners Inc.; Trish Holliday, assistant commissioner and chief learning officer, State of Tennessee Department of Human Resources; David Mansouri, president, State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE); Pam Brooks Martin, president, Cushion Employer Services; Patricia Shea, CEO, YWCA Nashville & Middle Tennessee; Dwight Tarwater, counsel to the governor, Governor Bill Haslam, State of Tennessee; LoLita Toney, director of development, National Museum of African American Music; Senator Jeff Yarbro, Tennessee General Assembly

“In my view, Leadership Tennessee has set the national standard in public service leadership development,” said Steve Joiner, dean of the College of Leadership & Public Service. “Since the programs inception, more than 100 highly influential leaders have completed the program and they are shaping the future of Tennessee, in no small part because of their experience with the team, past members and funders around the state. Leadership Tennessee models the mission of the College of Leadership & Public Service through ‘theory-to-practice’ education and development.”

Past classes have focused on key issues impacting the state including education, government efficiency and health and wellness. During the course of the program, each class participates in learning and conversation designed to give them a greater understanding of the complex issues affecting the success of the state. The 2016-17 Leadership Tennessee class will commence with a retreat in August.

Program participants said they have gained new perspective through Leadership Tennessee

“Leadership Tennessee has been a tremendously valuable and special experience,” said Lucia Folk, vice president for public affairs at Country Music Television (CMT) in Nashville and 2015-16 participant. “I’ve loved the opportunity to learn so much from my classmates about each region’s specific opportunities and challenges. The best part has been building new friendships and the fact that we all have the same goal—making Tennessee the best place to live in the world.”

“Everything I expected to gain from Leadership Tennessee I did but even more so. Though I had traveled our state extensively before, I discovered amazing people and places I didn’t know existed,” said Randy Boyd, Tennessee Commissioner for Community and Economic Development and member of the program’s inaugural class. “I hoped to get acquainted with others across the state, but underestimated the close and lasting friendships that would be made. And, I learned that while we often talk about the ‘grand divisions,’ far better it is to think of us a grand alliance. There is incredible strength in the diversity of our state and when we work together, anything is possible. All this and so much more I gained from my Leadership Tennessee experience.”

“But the benefits of Leadership Tennessee begin with graduation,” Boyd continued. “Since graduating, whether serving on the TICUA board, acting as chairman of United Way in my hometown or now serving in Governor Haslam’s cabinet or numerous other boards, there is one if not more of my classmates by my side. The deep and lasting friendships that are made will benefit me personally for the rest of my life, and if we put them to good use in our service to the state, they will hopefully be a benefit to our state as well.”

Mauricio Calvo, executive director of Latino Memphis Inc., has been a Memphis resident for 22 years. He said the program has “made me a proud Tennessean.”

“Leadership Tennessee has allowed me to get a much better and deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities of our state,” said Calvo, a 2015-16 participant. “We have a lot of work to do ahead of us, yet so many great resources. Leadership Tennessee is bringing light and connecting people. I have been to places, met people and had conversations that I otherwise I wouldn't have had. It is now upon me, and each one of my classmates, to act on it. That's what leaders do.”

“Leadership Tennessee is playing a catalytic role in helping our state build on its many successes and solve some of its most challenging problems,” said David Golden, senior vice president, chief legal and sustainability officer and corporate secretary at Eastman Chemical Company in Kingsport, Tennessee, and 2015-16 participant. “Leadership Tennessee helps build innovative partnerships, deepen understanding, foster communication and reveal insight. Participating in Leadership Tennessee has been a deeply inspirational, educational and enjoyable experience for me.”

For more information about Leadership Tennessee visit www.leadershiptennessee.org or contact Cate at 615.966.5180 catherine.cate@lipscomb.edu.

By: Kim Chaudoin

Leadership Tennessee announces Class IV

Lipscomb University’s College of Leadership & Public Service today announced the 2016-17 class for Leadership Tennessee, a leadership education program designed to cultivate a network of business, nonprofit, education and government leaders who are committed to addressing the state’s challenges and opportunities.

The class includes 40 business, government, education and nonprofit leaders from across Tennessee.

“Since the kickoff in 2013, Leadership Tennessee has brought together influential thought leaders from diverse backgrounds to not only learn more about the rich cultural heritage of our state, but also tackle tough issues that affect our state's success. Through dialogue and an expanding network, Leadership Tennessee members are taking what they see and learn on a statewide level and putting it into action in their own communities,” said Cathy Cate, executive director of Leadership Tennessee.

Cate said the program is quickly making an impact on Tennessee.

“With the announcement of its fourth class, Leadership Tennessee has proven the level of experience and leadership and the diversity of thought, perspective and regional and professional sector representation can be sustained. The quality and number of applicants continues to grow each year and we are excited to invite this next group of Leadership Tennessee members to a network of leaders around the state who are committed to the idea that we must all work together to create a stronger Tennessee.”

Leadership Tennessee is a 10-month program that provides collaborative learning and dialogue spanning the state’s three grand divisions, issue-specific education for demonstrated leaders, a diverse representation of participants and opportunities to affect change.  Last year, Leadership Tennessee received a $750,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to expand the program’s offerings, scope and impact on Tennessee.

Members of the 2016-17 Leadership Tennessee class

Alamo: Judge Brandon Gibson, Tennessee Court of Appeals

Chattanooga: Steven Angle, chancellor, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; Valoria Armstrong, president, Tennessee American Water; Alexis Bogo, executive director, Hamico Inc.; Bruce Hartmann, president, Chattanooga Times Free Press; JD Hickey, president and CEO, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee; Jill Levine, chief academic officer, Hamilton County Department of Education; Maura Sullivan, chief operating officer, City of Chattanooga

Franklin: Mendy Mazzo, vice president, Skanska; Jerry Stump, president and COO, Volkert, Inc.

Gallatin: Congressman Diane Black, United States Congress

Jackson: Kyle Spurgeon, president and CEO, Jackson Chamber

Kingsport: CeeGee McCord, director, Global Public Affairs and Corporate Responsibility, Eastman; Commissioner Kevin Triplett, Tennessee Department of Tourist Development

Knoxville: Christi Branscom, deputy to the mayor/COO, City of Knoxville; Krissy DeAlejandro, executive director, tnAchieves; Steve Diggs, president and CEO, Emerald Youth Foundation; Justin Maierhofer, vice president, government relations, Tennessee Valley Authority; Steve Mangum, Dean & Stokely Leadership Foundation Chair, Haslam College of Business, University of Tennessee Knoxville; Frank Rothermel, president, Denark Construction; Anthony Wise, president, Pellissippi State Community College

Lookout Mountain: Miller Wellborn, chairman, SmartBank and SmartFinancial, Inc.

Memphis: Greg Duckett, senior vice president and chief legal officer, Baptist Memorial Health Care Corporation; Cato Johnson, senior vice president, Public Policy & Regulatory Affairs, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare; Estella Mayhue-Greer, president and CEO, Mid-South Food Bank; Senator Mark Norris, Tennessee General Assembly; Terence Patterson, president, Downtown Memphis Commission; Phil Trenary, president and CEO, Greater Memphis Chamber; Representative Mark White, Tennessee General Assembly

Milligan College: Bill Greer, president, Milligan College

Nashville: Michael Anastasi, vice president of news, USA Today Network – Tennessee; Executive Editor, TheTennessean; Laura Berlind, executive director, The Sycamore Institute; Harold Carpenter, executive vice president and CFO, Pinnacle Financial Partners Inc.; Trish Holliday, assistant commissioner and chief learning officer, State of Tennessee Department of Human Resources; David Mansouri, president, State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE); Pam Brooks Martin, president, Cushion Employer Services; Patricia Shea, CEO, YWCA Nashville & Middle Tennessee; Dwight Tarwater, counsel to the governor, Governor Bill Haslam, State of Tennessee; LoLita Toney, director of development, National Museum of African American Music; Senator Jeff Yarbro, Tennessee General Assembly

“In my view, Leadership Tennessee has set the national standard in public service leadership development,” said Steve Joiner, dean of the College of Leadership & Public Service. “Since the programs inception, more than 100 highly influential leaders have completed the program and they are shaping the future of Tennessee, in no small part because of their experience with the team, past members and funders around the state. Leadership Tennessee models the mission of the College of Leadership & Public Service through ‘theory-to-practice’ education and development.”

Past classes have focused on key issues impacting the state including education, government efficiency and health and wellness. During the course of the program, each class participates in learning and conversation designed to give them a greater understanding of the complex issues affecting the success of the state. The 2016-17 Leadership Tennessee class will commence with a retreat in August.

Program participants said they have gained new perspective through Leadership Tennessee

“Leadership Tennessee has been a tremendously valuable and special experience,” said Lucia Folk, vice president for public affairs at Country Music Television (CMT) in Nashville and 2015-16 participant. “I’ve loved the opportunity to learn so much from my classmates about each region’s specific opportunities and challenges. The best part has been building new friendships and the fact that we all have the same goal—making Tennessee the best place to live in the world.”

“Everything I expected to gain from Leadership Tennessee I did but even more so. Though I had traveled our state extensively before, I discovered amazing people and places I didn’t know existed,” said Randy Boyd, Tennessee Commissioner for Community and Economic Development and member of the program’s inaugural class. “I hoped to get acquainted with others across the state, but underestimated the close and lasting friendships that would be made. And, I learned that while we often talk about the ‘grand divisions,’ far better it is to think of us a grand alliance. There is incredible strength in the diversity of our state and when we work together, anything is possible. All this and so much more I gained from my Leadership Tennessee experience.”

“But the benefits of Leadership Tennessee begin with graduation,” Boyd continued. “Since graduating, whether serving on the TICUA board, acting as chairman of United Way in my hometown or now serving in Governor Haslam’s cabinet or numerous other boards, there is one if not more of my classmates by my side. The deep and lasting friendships that are made will benefit me personally for the rest of my life, and if we put them to good use in our service to the state, they will hopefully be a benefit to our state as well.”

Mauricio Calvo, executive director of Latino Memphis Inc., has been a Memphis resident for 22 years. He said the program has “made me a proud Tennessean.”

“Leadership Tennessee has allowed me to get a much better and deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities of our state,” said Calvo, a 2015-16 participant. “We have a lot of work to do ahead of us, yet so many great resources. Leadership Tennessee is bringing light and connecting people. I have been to places, met people and had conversations that I otherwise I wouldn't have had. It is now upon me, and each one of my classmates, to act on it. That's what leaders do.”

“Leadership Tennessee is playing a catalytic role in helping our state build on its many successes and solve some of its most challenging problems,” said David Golden, senior vice president, chief legal and sustainability officer and corporate secretary at Eastman Chemical Company in Kingsport, Tennessee, and 2015-16 participant. “Leadership Tennessee helps build innovative partnerships, deepen understanding, foster communication and reveal insight. Participating in Leadership Tennessee has been a deeply inspirational, educational and enjoyable experience for me.”

Leadership Tennessee adds Stone, McAnally to leadership team.

Leadership Tennessee, an initiative of Lipscomb University’s College of Leadership & Public Service, has appointed two Nashville leaders to its leadership team.

Kathryn Clark Stone and Patrick McAnally will help expand Leadership Tennessee’s public outreach efforts to engage Tennesseans in conversations about the most challenging issues facing the state. The expansion of the program is a result of Leadership Tennessee’s $750,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to expand the program’s offerings, scope and impact on Tennessee that the program received this summer.

“Engaging the community in conversations around key issues that are important to Tennessee and to provide a forum for individuals with a variety of viewpoints and interests is an important way Leadership Tennessee can make a greater impact on this state,” said Cathy Cate, Leadership Tennessee executive director. “Kate and Patrick bring to this program expertise that will help us develop meaningful programming and conversations.”

Stone is director of engagement for Leadership Tennessee. An attorney, Stone was coordinator of volunteer, internship and national safe place services for Nashville’s Oasis Center Inc. and served as assistant public defender in the juvenile division of the Office of the Metropolitan Nashville Public Defender prior to her appointment at Lipscomb. From January 2010 through July 2011, Stone was assistant general counsel for the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services’ Mid-Cumberland Region. She was literacy program coordinator for the AmeriCorps-Indiana Reading Corps from August 2005 through July 2006, where she implemented and coordinated literacy programs in 11 school and community centers in Indianapolis, Ind., to provide supplemental services to disadvantaged elementary students.

A graduate of the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, Stone received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Vanderbilt University. She is a member of the YWCA junior board, and is a volunteer for the Foster Care Review Board, is a former volunteer running coach for the Next Door and is a conversemos volunteer at Conexîon Las Americas.

McAnally is community engagement manager for Leadership Tennessee. A native of Decatur, Ala., McAnally has expertise in conflict management, political campaigning, fundraising and grassroots organization. He co-founded Volunteer Solutions, a conflict management company and consensus-building firm focused on public policy, public participation, community outreach and government relations. He also was a co-facilitator for the Bureau of Land Management’s Spring 2015 Public Outreach for the Draft Regional Management Plan for Western Oregon earlier this year, and worked on Tennessee governor Bill Haslam’s 2010 gubernatorial campaign.

McAnally holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in law, justice and society and a Master of Arts degree in conflict management from Lipscomb University.

Leadership Tennessee, launched in February 2013, is designed to cultivate a statewide network of business, nonprofit, education and government leaders who are committed to addressing the state’s challenges and opportunities.

The College of Leadership & Public Service offers a Master of Arts in civic leadership. Its signature community programs, produced with local, regional and statewide partners, include citizen leadership academies on critical issues, community leadership programs, customized leadership development and online resources.

For more information about Leadership Tennessee visit www.leadershiptennessee.org or contact Cate at 615.966.5180 catherine.cate@lipscomb.edu.

Leadership Tennessee brings leaders from across the state to Nashville

Connecting leaders from across Tennessee, creating awareness and building networks are hallmarks of Leadership Tennessee, a leadership education program designed to cultivate a network of business, nonprofit, education and government leaders who are committed to addressing the state’s challenges and opportunities.

The innovative program, a leadership education initiative of Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership housed in the College of Leadership & Public Service, recently launched its third cohort and made a stop in Nashville for participants to learn more about the city and its culture.

Though the third cohort of Leadership Tennessee began with a retreat in August, members of the class, which includes 34 business, government, education and nonprofit leaders from across the state, say the program is already having an impact.

“This program is about having a chance to meet people from all corners of this great state who are interested in education, improving the state of our economic development, finding partnerships across Tennessee and getting to know the leaders in other communities is already making a difference in the way I view the world,” says Ron Samuels, chairman, founder and CEO of Avenue Bank in Nashville. “Our class also has a great diversity is age, culture, industry and background which also helps give me new perspective.”

Steve Joiner, dean of the College of Leadership & Public Service, welcomed the group to the Lipscomb campus on Sept. 20 as part of their Nashville visit.

“We want to facilitate conversations about issues facing Tennessee as we travel across the state this year,” he told the group of assembled leaders. “Among the key issues are education, health care and economic development. We hope to create a greater awareness of what is important to various communities and to equip those who will be the problem-solvers in those areas with the knowledge and network to help them be more effective leaders.”

Leadership Tennessee, which earlier this year received a $750,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to expand the program’s offerings, scope and impact on the state, is expanding the perspective of its class members.

“Leadership Tennessee is giving us access to talk to other leaders in the state and to hear other leaders share their challenges, successes and perspectives on what is important to their part of the state and how they are impacted by what happens in other parts of the state,” says Agenia Clark, president and CEO of the Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee. “The conversations that we are having makes me realize what a large state we are, but that we all want answers to the same questions.”

Participant Thomas Zacharia agrees.

“This program is providing a tremendous opportunity to interact with colleagues from different walks of life, from different communities and industries who have different challenges and successes,” says Zacharia, deputy director for science and technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory near Knoxville. “We have a diversity of ideas and approaches and opportunities to contribute to the success of our state.”

Although participant Crissy Haslam may be more familiar with issues and opportunities facing Tennessee in her role as First Lady, she expects to learn a lot from her fellow classmates and from the program.

“I am looking forward to what we will see and learn this year,” she says. “It is a definite benefit for those who are making an impact on our state to get to know each other and to get to know the state better as we travel to a variety of cities and learn about other communities first-hand.”

Jason Little, president and CEO of Baptist Memorial Healthcare in Memphis, says he is “honored to be selected to participate in Leadership Tennessee and to get to come together with others throughout the state to make improvements to a place we all love.”

While in Nashville, the group met with Gov. Bill Haslam; visited Brick Church College Prep School, where Chris Reynolds, CEO of LEAD Public Schools, discussed the charter school initiative; and participated in an overview discussion about state standards with former Tennessee commissioner of education Kevin Huffman.

A discussion the Tennessee K-12 education landscape featured a panel of experts including moderator Dan Challener (current class member?), president of the Public Education Foundation; Chris Barbic, superintendent of the Achievement School District; Ron Woodard, principal of Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools’ Maplewood High School; Rep. Brenda Gilmore, 54th District, Tennessee House of Representatives; and Lucia Folk (current class member), vice president for public affairs at Country Music Television.

The group also examined the Insure Tennessee plan, a two-year pilot program proposal? that introduces market principles to Medicaid, provides coverage to more than

200,000 low-income Tennesseans at no additional cost to taxpayers and leverages a payment reform initiative that is working to control health care costs and improve the quality of care.

Leading the discussion was a panel of experts that included moderator Rick Johnson, president and CEO of the Governor’s Foundation for Health and Wellness (past Leadership Tennessee participant); Lindsay Boyd, director of policy at the Beacon Center of Tennessee; Vaughn Frigon, physician and TennCare chief medical officer; and Mark Cate, president and principal of the Stones River Group and former Haslam administration chief of staff (past Leadership Tennessee participant).

Activities also included visiting several Nashville eateries along with a visit to Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee, where participants heard from the organization’s president and CEO Jaynee Day (past Leadership Tennessee participant) and had lunch at the Second Harvest Culinary Arts Center.

The next stop for the 2015-16 Leadership Tennessee class will be in Knoxville Nov. 8-9.

Leadership Tennessee, which launched in February 2013, has already had an impact in its first two years of existence as more than 60 business, government, education and nonprofit leaders from across Tennessee have participated in the program’s first two classes. For more information about Leadership Tennessee visit www.leadershiptennessee.org or contact Leadership Tennessee executive director Cathy Cate at 615.966.5180 cathy.cate@leadershiptennesse.org.

Leadership Tennessee initiative receives $750,000 grant to expand scope, impact on state

Grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation comes as leadership program marks second anniversary, launch of third class

Leadership Tennessee, a leadership education initiative of Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership, housed in Lipscomb’s new College of Leadership & Public Service, has received a $750,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to expand the program’s offerings, scope and impact on Tennessee.

Leadership Tennessee, launched in February 2013, is designed to cultivate a statewide network of business, nonprofit, education and government leaders who are committed to addressing the state’s challenges and opportunities.

“To be chosen as the recipient of this grant gives Lipscomb a unique opportunity to partner with an organization that is having a profound impact in the lives of billions around the globe by funding initiatives that identify needs and drive change,” said L. Randolph Lowry, Lipscomb University president. “This grant is affirmation from a highly respected organization, which believes strongly in the importance of education, that Leadership Tennessee is a valuable program that is making a difference in our state and its individual communities. It is also a reflection of many people in the Lipscomb community who have worked very hard over the last several years to engage the larger community through a number of programs. This is a tremendous honor.”

Cathy Cate, Leadership Tennessee executive director, said the Gates Foundation grant provides resources to expand the program beyond its current format.

“This is very exciting for Leadership Tennessee and validates the effectiveness of the program and the long-term potential impact it can have on our state,” said Cate. “The grant will give us an opportunity to include more conversations around key issues in more areas of the state, incorporating our growing alumni network as well as new and existing partners. A strength of our program is that we are a neutral voice bringing together individuals with a variety of viewpoints and interests to give them a forum to develop their own informed opinions about issues statewide.”

The grant, which will be disbursed over a three-year period, will be used to fund administrative needs. In addition, it will:

  • Develop statewide forums, in partnership with organizations throughout the state, including a series of timely and relevant discussions by community members on topics of state importance such as access, equity and economic development, and education’s role in addressing these issues. These forums would be facilitated by Lipscomb’s network of nationally known and trained professionals and facilitators. Through these conversations, communities will have a greater awareness of the connection between the addressed issues and greater quality of life in the state;
  • Expand the alumni network of Leadership Tennessee and continue to encourage them to be leaders in engaging others in dialogue on issues of importance in their local, regional or statewide communities and to create change and conversations in these communities;
  • Launch a leadership education program targeting young and emerging leaders to expand dialogue about key issues through a series of seminars and/or other development opportunities;
  • Convene statewide conversations of significance through seminars, forums and facilitated conversations about key issues affecting those areas; and
  • Continue to grow Leadership Tennessee’s signature program, a 10-month program providing collaborative learning and dialogue spanning the state’s three grand divisions, issue-specific education for demonstrated leaders and a diverse representation of participants and opportunities to affect change. 

“We need to embrace and respect the differences in our communities, but we are one state. The goal of these programs is to break through the barriers that keep us from collaborating and to make Tennessee the best it can be for all of its citizens,” said Cate.

The program came to the attention of the Gates Foundation through several past Leadership Tennessee participants, who credit the program with identifying, cultivating and nurturing collaborative leadership through learning, reflection and action.

“As a Leadership Tennessee alumna, I have learned from my colleagues and count them as friends and partners in a lifelong journey to make Tennessee a great place to live, work and raise a family,” said Teresa Sloyan, executive director of Hyde Family Foundations in Memphis. “We are thankful to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for their generous support of Leadership Tennessee, which recognizes that there is something special happening in Tennessee, and, at the end of the day, we are all connected and accountable for improving the lives and expanding opportunities for the folks in our respective communities.”

Randy Boyd, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development and inaugural Leadership Tennessee class member, said the program benefitted him as he “discovered resources I never knew our state had, although I had traveled it a lot.

“I also came to appreciate how when those resources are aligned and work together we can make great advances for Tennessee,” he said. “But the greatest benefit was getting to know other leaders across the state who shared the same passion for making Tennessee great. Since ‘graduation,’ it is not a surprise that we all cross paths regularly and the strong personal bonds we developed make us an even better team. I'm excited about the prospect of generations of leaders benefiting from this program and its impact on the future of our state."

Leadership Tennessee is already having an impact in its first two years of existence as more than 60 business, government, education and nonprofit leaders from across Tennessee have participated in the program’s first two classes.

“Leadership Tennessee is an experience like few others,” said Candice McQueen, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Education, member of the inaugural class and former dean of Lipscomb’s College of Education. “It certainly helped prepare me for taking on a statewide role, but it also helped me see and appreciate our incredible state and leadership. Both the networking and the learning have proven valuable to me as a commissioner – from developing professional mentoring relationships to understanding complex challenges in our state.” 

“Leadership Tennessee is important because it connects and networks leaders across our state and fosters collaborations that otherwise would not occur,” said Joe DiPietro, president of the University of Tennessee system and Leadership Tennessee Class of 2015 member. “It also provides broader perspective of the diverse and important needs for leadership in Tennessee. Participants gain training and information from the program that strengthens their leadership skills and makes them more effective. The biggest impact the program had on me was seeing that Tennessee is a state on the move in the right direction in so many ways; a state that is blessed with a wealth of talented and passionate leaders who assure its future is very, very bright.” 

Leadership Tennessee, administered by the Andrews Institute, is housed in Lipscomb’s new College of Leadership & Public Service.

“The Leadership Tennessee program is a prime example of an initiative that walks out the mission of the college,” saidSteve Joiner, dean of Lipscomb’s College of Leadership & Public Service. “This college is built around the reality that the issues government and public entities are asked to solve today for the people they serve are exceedingly complex. They require conversation, collaboration and a partner in convening this dialogue and finding common ground. Leadership Tennessee is that partner, and this grant will expand this work in a way that has the potential to have a great impact on our state.”

The Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership offers a Master of Arts in civic leadership. Its signature community programs, produced with local, regional and statewide partners, include citizen leadership academies on critical issues, community leadership programs, customized leadership development and online resources.

For more information about Leadership Tennessee visit www.leadershiptennessee.org or contact Cate at 615.966.5180 catherine.cate@leadershiptennessee.org

Member Login
Welcome, (First Name)!

Forgot? Show
Log In
Enter Member Area
My Profile Log Out